Sequence Listing USPTO Standard (Precise Format)

Sequence listing USPTO is an indispensable part of the patent application while filing. Sequence listings become a part of your biological patents where amino acid and nucleotide sequences disclosure is mandatory. Indeed there is certain sequence listing USPTO standards for filing sequence listings in both national and international applications.

Sequence Listing USPTO Standard: Key Points

The sequence listing USPTO rules require the use of standard symbols and a standard format for submitting sequence data in most patent applications. For the sequence rules and the discussion in the phrase “disclosed nucleic acid”, it intends to refer to nucleic or amino acid sequences. The description is in the patent application by enumeration of their residues and that meet the length thresholds.

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Symbols and Format for Nucleotide Sequence Listings:

Symbols are the abbreviated representations of the bases that make up a nucleotide sequence. While the format of Sequence Listings USPTO is how you represent the amino acid and nucleotide bases in the list.

Symbols for Nucleotide Sequences:

  • Represent the bases of a nucleotide sequence by using the one-letter code for nucleotide sequence characters. Also, identify those sequences by lower case characters.
  • Modifications in the bases by the corresponding unmodified bases or as “n” in the sequence itself. One may use these codes in the description or the feature section of the sequence listing but not in the sequence itself. The symbol “n” is the equivalent of only one unknown or modified nucleotide in the sequence listing USPTO rules.

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Format for Nucleotide Sequences:

The format of the sequence listing USPTO for nucleotide sequences is:

  • A nucleotide sequence shall contain a maximum of 60 bases per line, with a space between each group of 10 bases.
  • One must list the bases of a nucleotide sequence in groups of 10 bases, except in the coding parts of the sequence. Also, one must group together the leftover bases, fewer than 10 in numbers at the end of noncoding parts of a sequence. Also, they must be separated from adjacent groups by a space.
  •  List the bases of the coding parts of a nucleotide sequence as triplets (codons).
  • Present the nucleotide sequence only by a single strand, in the 5’-end to 3’-end direction from left to right in a continuous fashion. The terms 3’ and 5’ shall not be represented in the sequence.
  • One must mark it in the right margin, next to the line containing the one-letter codes for the bases. Also, it must give the number of the last base of that line. The enumeration method for nucleotide sequences applies to nucleotide sequences that are circular in configuration as well.
  • Prepare a separate sequence if there is a nucleotide sequence that is made up of one or more non-contiguous segments. Mark them with a separate sequence identifier.
  • Moreover, if there is a sequence with a gap or gaps then number them as a plurality of separate sequences with separate sequence identifiers.

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Symbols for Amino Acid Sequences:

  • Represent the amino acids using the three-letter code with the first letter as capital.
  • An amino acid sequence that contains a blank or internal terminator symbols may not be represented as a single amino acid sequence. One must present them as separate amino acid sequences.
  • Represent modified and unusual amino acids as “Xaa” in the sequence itself. Also, provide a description of modification in the feature section of the sequence listing using codes. Moreover, these codes are a part of the description or the feature section of the sequence listing but not in the sequence itself. The symbol “Xaa” is the equivalent of only one unknown or modified amino acid.

Format for Amino Acid Sequences:

The format for the amino acid sequence listing USPTO is:

  • The representation of amino acids in a protein or peptide sequence is from amino to carboxy direction from left to right. But, there is no representation of amino and carboxy groups in the sequence.
  • There are a maximum of 16 amino acid per line for each protein or peptide sequence with space provided between each amino acid.
  • the positioning of Amino acids corresponding to the codons in the coding parts of a nucleotide sequence is immediately under the corresponding codons.
  • The enumeration of amino acids shall start at the first amino acid of the sequence, with number 1.
  • Adding on to the complexity of amino acids, the amino acids preceding the mature protein. For example pre-sequences, pro-sequences, and signal-sequences, when present, may have negative numbers, counting backwards starting with the amino acid next to number 1.
  • Furthermore, if an amino acid sequence made up of one or more non-contiguous segments, then number those sequences separately with a separate sequence identifier. Moreover, if there is a sequence with a gap then number them as a plurality of separate sequences with separate sequence identifiers.

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Why Choose Us? – The Sequence Listing Company

Sequence Listing USPTO standard is one of the most important aspects of getting biological invention through examination of the patent office. Also, looking for points of similarity in a sequence with millionth of length is as overwhelming and tedious as it sounds. Therefore, it is better to find an expert with years of experience preparing sequence listings for people like you out there. So, if you are looking for one such expert ‘The Sequence Listing Company’ is at your end. We have years of experience preparing sequence listings as per the Patent Office Standards USPTO. Moreover, we offer a quick turn-around-time to ensure timely delivery of services. Also, we take care of the pockets of our customers and hence offer budget-friendly rates. To avail our services, visit The Sequence Listing Company.  

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